Brighton Architectural Controls

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY

Brighton is a unique family community nestled in Holmwood in the east end of Saskatoon, just north of 8th Street and south of College Drive. It is an innovative, master-planned neighbourhood with housing, parklands, trails, public transit, retail, schools, employment zones and office space. Brighton is the ideal place to live, work, learn, shop and play for generations to come. This community has a unique and progressive identity crafted from the very first stages of its unique design which will instill pride and a sense of belonging for all new homeowners.

The Architectural Controls aim to create an aesthetically pleasing streetscape while encouraging a variety of different exterior dwelling materials visible from public spaces. Our vision is that all dwellings in Brighton will incorporate one of the following styles in their design:

Brighton, tudor Brighton, prairie Brighton, arts & crafts Brighton, craftsmen Brighton, french country Brighton, colonial
Tudor Prairie Arts & Crafts Craftsmen French Country Colonial

Other dwelling styles (Farmhouse, Contemporary, Victorian, etc.) will only be considered in special cases and will require review from the Design Review Committee.

Architectural Control Application Form

PROCESS

         DWELLING STYLES         

GENERAL

ARCHITECTURAL CONTROLS 

SPECIFIC

ARCHITECTURAL CONTROLS

Step 1: Choose a Dwelling Style
step 2: Review General Architectural Controls
step 3: Review Specific Architectural Controls

Each dwelling must be based on one of the styles below. Combining styles is prohibited.

These architectural controls apply to all lots regardless of Dwelling Style, Phase, and Lot Type. All submitted dwelling plans must address the items listed below. 

These architectural controls are specific to the dwelling Phase and Lot Type. All submitted dwelling plans must address the items listed below in addition to the General Architectural Controls.

TUDOR
MASSING & Relief
Phase 1
PRAIRIE
REPETITION
 
ARTS & CRAFTS
FRONT ENTRY
 
CRAFTSMEN
Exterior MATERIALS
 
FRENCH COUNTRY
GARAGES
 
COLONIAL
Highly Visible Lots
 

 

DWELLING STYLES

In addition to the specific Architectural Requirements, dwellings in Brighton should implement the following styles. Although exact replicas of these styles are not required, they are presented here to give builders some basis to work from. Other dwelling styles will only be considered in special cases and will require review from the Design Review Committee.

Ten (10) or more design features of each style are identified. When submitting plans for Architectural and Development Controls Review, the builder must state the style of dwelling they wish to build. In addition to the specific Architectural Requirements, the builder must note on their application form and show on their plans at least five (5) design features that were added to the dwelling design to replicate the chosen dwelling style.

The Design Review Committee may request additional design features to be added to the design to make sure the style is distinguishable.

Tudor Style

The Tudor Style is based on a variety of early English building traditions.  Most dwellings in this style emphasize high-pitched gable roofs, elaborate stone/brick chimneys, and decorative trim detailing.  

Brighton, Tudor, saskatoon

click on image

 
DESIGN FEATURES & MATERIALS
 
  • Exposed structural supports with heavy beam ends or brackets.
  • Tall narrow windows with Colonial or Diamond style window grilles.
  • 50 sq. ft or more of masonry on first storey front elevation.
  • Half-hip roof in gables
  • Light coloured cement board or stucco filling between dark trim half-timbering.
  • Decorative half-timbering (half-timbering is darker with lighter walls). Installed on second storey or in gables.
  • Front-facing multi-gable roofs of varying heights.
  • Groupings of windows.
  • Carriage-style garage doors with overlay trim or four windows along the top.
  • Vertical trim – widths 8-10 inches with dark or natural colours.
  • Masonry chimneys.
  • Elaborate front entry with detailing around front door.
  • Horizontal trim can be dominant and heavier 12-14 inches.

 

 

Prairie Style

Prairie Style dwellings originated in the Midwest U.S. by Frank Lloyd Wright.  These dwellings were designed to reflect the flat horizon of the prairie landscape using low sloped roofs, broad overhangs, and accented horizontal trims and materials.  

Brighton, Prairie Style, Saskatoon

click on image

 
DESIGN FEATURES & MATERIALS
 
  • Low slope roof, e.g. 4:12 roof pitch, with large overhang that provide shelter.
  • Stone or Brick columns
  • Covered entry at the front of dwelling with columns.
  • Rectangular windows with 8-10" trim surrounding.
  • Two foot returns on stone or brick wall corners.
  • Carriage-style garage door with overlay, wood tone, three or more windows in double wide door, or two windows along the top in each single wide door.
  • Contrasting horizontal trims separating upper and lower wall finishes.
  • Horizontal trim at soffit and at base to windows. Widths min. 6-10" in dark colour or natural colours.
  • Prairie or Ladder style window grilles.
  • 50 sq. ft. of brick or stucco on front elevation.
  • Wide front entry with side windows on front facing front door.
 

Arts & Crafts

The term "Arts and Crafts" refers to the early 19th-century British and American movement to revive handicrafts. The movement was also the inspiration behind the Craftsman and bungalow styles. 

Brighton, Arts Crafts, Saskatoon

click on image

 
DESIGN FEATURES & MATERIALS
 
  • Front Porches: Most dwellings in the Arts and Crafts style have porches.
  • Gable roof over entry.
  • Elements of accent colour can be added to trims and entry.
  • Entry columns that are 24" wide square or round columns that have stone at least halfway up.
  • Exposed beams: The beams on the porch and inside the gables are often exposed. Use of knee braces in gables.
  • Carriage style garage door with overlay, garage door(s) with windows horizontally along the top, or wood tone that matches the natural finishes, exposed beams or knee braces.
  • Roofs are typically lower pitched, e.g. 5-12. Dwellings have a low roof with wide eaves and knee braces.
  • Window or garage door shades with knee braces.
  • Ladder or Craftsman style window grilles.
  • Front facing multi-gable roofs.
  • Natural finishes of shakes or wood siding with a clear finish or deep wood finish. The natural finish should contrast in colour or depth of tone with body of dwelling.
  • Excess additional window groupings

Craftsmen Style

Inspired by post and beam or log dwellings in mountain settings, this informal style features lofty ceilings and open floor plans. Craftsman Style dwelling plans typically blend well with nature, and their exteriors frequently incorporate the use of natural materials. 

Brighton, Craftsmen, Saskatoon

click on image

 
DESIGN FEATURES & MATERIALS
 
  • High vaulted ceilings with exposed timber beams and trusses. 
  • Exposed decorative beams, knee braces and brackets to add character.
  • Partially paned front door and side windows.
  • Glass windows – grouped/double hung with ladder or craftsmen grilles.
  • Short roof shade over top garage door with knee braces and brackets.
  • Carriage style garage door with overlay, garage door(s) with windows horizontally along the top, or wood tone that matches the natural finishes, exposed beams or knee braces.  Garage windows should have matching grilles to the dwelling windows. 
  • Large covered porches or veranda.
  • Natural finishes of shakes, board and batten, or wood siding with a clear finish or deep wood finish. The natural finish should contrast in colour or depth of tone with body of dwelling. Materials separated with trim board.
  • Dominant gables with decorative truss detail sitting out from the face of the dwelling.
  • Large scale timber columns or tapered columns. Stone or brick halfway up.
  • 50 sq. ft. of stone or shakes accent materials on front elevation.
 

French Country Style

French Country dwellings draw from both the smaller country cottages and large rural estates of France. The style is characterized by a steep hipped roof, and dwellings may include turrets, finials, and shaped chimneys.  Bays and decorative windows lend character to the facade.  

Brighton, french country, saskatoon

click on image

 
DESIGN FEATURES & MATERIALS
 
  • Rounded eyebrow arches on entry, garage door and/or windows.
  • Eyebrow dormer breaking through the roof line.
  • Use of lantern style light fixtures.
  • Use of shutters or iron window accents.
  • Strong soffit detail continuous around primary roof with total built up depth of 12-20 inches.
  • Carriage style garage door with overlay, garage door(s) with windows horizontally along the top should be arched to follow the rounded eyebrow, flush garage door with enhanced stonework design around the door.  
  • Grouping of tall rectangular windows.
  • Window frames are classically detailed with head sill and columnar details on the vertical.
  • Steep hipped roofs, e.g. 8:12 - 12:12, with modest overhang.
  • Rotunda design.
  • Building mass should be stone or stucco.
  • Front facing multi-roofs of varying heights.
  • Colonial or Diamond style window grilles

 

 

Colonial Style

Typically, the Colonial-style dwelling includes a symmetrical facade, regularly-spaced single windows, and some decorative accent over the front door. Historically speaking, this style developed in the original thirteen American colonies, as settlers adapted European building techniques to the materials available and the climates in their New World colonies. The Colonial dwelling plans being built in America today are more accurately called "Colonial Revival," which was first seen around 1880, and grew rapidly after World War I.  

Brighton, Colonial, saskatoon

click on image

 
DESIGN FEATURES & MATERIALS
 
  • Rectangular with a symmetrical facade
  • Front door with sidelights and topped by transom windows.
  • Front-facing second storey balconies with railings.
  • Two-storey dwelling.
  • Arched or peeked entry cover.
  • Garage doors with vertical groove indents or garage doors with even number of windows that have colonial grilles would be acceptable.*
  • Use of dormers and chimneys.
  • Traditional columns flanking the entry.
 
  • Evenly spaced shuttered windows with Colonial-style window grilles.
  • Use of light-coloured exterior and dark-coloured shutters.
 

*Contemporary or Flush garage doors are not permitted. 

 

GENERAL ARCHITECTURAL CONTROLS

These controls apply to lots regardless of phase and lot type and are in addition to the controls found in the "Architectural Controls by Phase & Lot Type" section below.

Massing & Relief

All dwelling volumes must incorporate intermittent variances in plan and elevation to encourage shadow lines on facades and visible elevations which will enhance the streetscape by introducing interesting architecture.  This includes all dwelling elevations that are adjacent to or visible from public streets or open spaces.

Saskatoon Land, Brighton

Repetition

Three (3) lots are required in between homes before the same elevation and colours may be repeated on the same side of the street.  The same elevation and colours may not be repeated across the street.  See example image below.

Brighton, Saskatoon Land
Brighton, Saskatoon Land The same dwelling elevation on the lot that is circled can only be built on lots with green stars.

Colours are defined as primary material siding or masonry.

Elevations are defined as the exact same front elevation no matter which side the garage is on.  Examples of acceptable changes could include a combination of, but not limited to, the following: roof and dormer orientation and slope, front attached garage roof style or orientation, the size and location of windows and doors, window grilles, material colours and finishes.

If one builder has multiple lots adjacent to each other or across the street, three to five different front elevations are required.

Saskatoon Land, brighton
Example of variation in elevations.

Front Entry

Front Door Placement

It is strongly encouraged that the front door of a dwelling be visible on the front facade by directly facing the fronting street. If the door does not face the street, a combination of architectural elements such as verandas, front-window enhancements, additional front accent materials or other architectural elements will be required to enhance the dwelling entrance. 

Brighton, Saskatoon Land
Example of acceptable front door placement. If the front door does not face the street additional architectural elements are required. 

Depending on Saskatoon Land’s evaluation of any submitted plans, especially those that satisfy only the “minimum” requirements of this document, Saskatoon Land may require architectural details such as the following:

  • Accented wall build-outs or interruptions in wall planes. 

  • Window and door accents. 

  • Break-ups in roof massing or roof lines such as dormers or cross gables.

  • Other accents or placement of material or colour.

Columns & Railings 

In the event that columns are used, column styles must be consistent with the overall architectural style of the dwelling.  Front columns are to be a minimum of 10" wide. All railing material is to be metal or an approved no-maintenance material.

All columns must have a cap and a base, the base of column is not to overhang the landing or veranda.  All columns must support a beam and not the soffit.

Verandas

The use of front verandas on dwellings in Brighton is strongly encouraged. A veranda is defined as a usable space on the front of the dwelling which is larger than 10 feet wide (parallel to the street). Where possible, wrap-around front porches/verandas should be incorporated into corner lots. Verandas are typically covered, with multiple columns and a railing.  Where a veranda is used on the dwelling, wood verandas and steps are permitted.

Front Stairs & Entry 

Stair systems, landings and verandas must be enclosed on all sides. Using steel risers on stairs is permitted as long as the steel is not visible and encased by wood or a no-maintenance type material. Entry systems, landings and verandas must be stained or painted to match the dwelling. The sides of all front steps and verandas are to be skirted with a no-maintenance type material.  Lattice screens alone will not be permitted as a skirting material.

Dwellings with front attached garage, where no veranda is used, front steps must be constructed using one of the following:  pre-cast concrete, cast-in-situ concrete, exposed aggregate concrete.

Entry Features 

Dwellings require an architecturally significant entry feature.  Features should be consistent with the overall architectural style of the dwelling.  This may include the use of covered verandas, modern contemporary interpretations of pergolas or covered entry features. Front doors must be painted to match the dwelling colour scheme.

Brighton, Saskatoon Land Brighton, Saskatoon Land
Examples of acceptable stairs and entry features.

Exterior Materials

For additional material requirements on Highly Visible lots, see specific lot details located in the Architectural Controls by Phase & Lot Type section below. 

All dwellings require a minimum of two different exterior dwelling materials on the front elevation with each material being no less than 50 square feet in area, or a minimum of three different exterior dwelling materials with the second and third materials combined being no less than 50 square feet in area (or 25 square feet each). 

Note: Material types and square footage must be clearly identified on the drawings submitted in support of your application. Failure to do so may result in delays to the approval of your application.

Front Elevation Material Calculations
Highly Visible Lot Side or Rear Material Calculations
Aspen Ridge, saskatoon Saskatoon Land

Three Materials Example:

Stucco = 100 square feet

Stone Column = 10 square feet | Stone Garage = 70 square feet

Hardie Siding = 60 square feet

The stone and Hardie siding exceed the minimum three material requirement of 25 square

feet (standard & laned lots) and 40 square feet (walk-out lots).

Red (surface elevation) = 130 square feet (1st storey) | 85 square feet (2nd storey)
Blue (windows and doors) = 120 square feet
Green (secondary material) = 126 square feet

Secondary Material Required:
215 square feet (surface elevation) minus 120 square feet​ (windows/ doors) = 95 square feet x 33% = 31 square feet required

  • Trim features, roof shingles and parging will not be counted as a material. In order to be included towards the required material amount, the material must be visibly shown on the 2D elevation plan. Material wrapped around a column or architectural feature is encouraged to provide cleaner edges, but will not count towards the required material total for the elevation in review.

  • The materials being used need to be distinctly different and discernible from each other. Two similar materials with visually different textures will be considered two materials. For example, Hardie siding and Hardie shakes; or vinyl siding and vinyl board and batten will be accepted as two materials. Vinyl siding with vinyl shakes; or vinyl siding with vinyl scallops; or the same material in different orientation are NOT two materials.  Contrast with the trim materials and exterior dwelling materials being used is also encouraged. 

  • For the purpose of the material calculation, the total area of elevation is from the ground to under the eaves. Windows and doors shall be subtracted.

Exterior Finishes

  • ​Siding – vinyl, *Hardie board, or Aluminum

  • Traditional Lap profile is required for all vinyl siding.

  • Acrylic Stucco

  • Brick

  • *Cultured stone

  • *Smartboard

  • Shakes – Cedar or *Hardie shakes. Vinyl shakes are permitted as accents in gables only.

* where a brand name is specified, approved equivalents will be considered.

Masonry

Brighton, masonry, exterior finishes

  • Where masonry is proposed, it must portray structural integrity.

  • Masonry returns are to be a minimum of 2 feet.

  • All masonry is to go down to as close to finished grade as possible, to a maximum of 3” from grade.

Parging

Brighton, parging, exterior finishes

On the front face of the dwelling all materials are to go down to as close to finished grade as possible, to a maximum of 3” from grade.

Brighton, parging, exterior finishes

On the inside/front entrance side of Front Drive Garage, parging should go down to close to finished grade as possible, to a maximum of 3” from grade for a 2 foot return, and then is permitted to step up to 6” maximum.

Brighton, parging, exterior finishes

On the exterior side of the garage a maximum of 24” of parging is permitted after a 2 foot return. 24” of parging is permitted on all other elevations.

In cases where the side elevations are sloping, parging should be tiered or sloped to follow the grade. Parging is not considered a material and will not be counted towards the material calculations.

Window Trims and Sills

  • *Smartboard/*Hardiboard
  • *Cultured Stone
  • All trims used on home are to be finished off correctly i.e. trims must not return around the corner and be left floating, they should be finished off with a vertical trim (see examples).

* where a brand name is specified, approved equivalents will be considered.

Note: stucco, aluminum or vinyl are not permitted window trim materials on any elevation.

Brighton, Saskatoon Land
Examples of acceptable trim return.

Flashing

All flashing used on the home exterior, including the roof, is to be prefinished to blend with adjacent materials. Galvanized metal flashing is not permitted on any part of the home, which is visible from the street or lane.

Garages

Dwellings with a front attached garage must construct a minimum single-wide garage.  The garage must be constructed at the same time as the dwelling is built.  Minimum inside dimensions shall be 3.5m wide and 6m long.A lot with a secondary garage off the lane shall not be built on the rear easement and must have a paved apron that connects the garage pad to the rear property line.

Placement

For lots requiring an attached garage, a garage side location is determined on the Interactive Map unless the lot is marked with a “C” for corner lot garage placement. For corner attached garage lots, the garage must be located as per the permitted garage sides shown below.  The image below demonstrates the permitted options for the placement of an attached garage on a corner lot, attached to the front of the dwelling furthest from the street corner or attached to the rear of the dwelling closest to the side street.

Garage sides on a given block are paired together against a common property line in order to provide a better streetscape appearance. Lot purchasers should check curb design, street light pole locations, utility pedestal locations, and mailbox locations, prior to designing a dwelling with a garage on the side.

Saskatoon Land, garage

Aspen Ridge, Saskatoon

Examples of proper garage placement on corner lots.

 

Highly Visible Lots

 Alternate materials are required for side and rear dwelling facades that face streets and open spaces. These alternate material requirements are over and above the noted material requirements for the dwelling Lot Type. The intention of these controls is to avoid the monotony and the perceived cheapness of large expanses of blank walls. The lots that are relevant to these highly visible lot controls are identified in the Specific Architectural Controls below. 

 

SPECIFIC ARCHITECTURAL CONTROLS

In addition to the controls outlined above, each phase and lot has specific architectural controls. The requirements listed in each lot type section are an absolute minimum. Saskatoon Land reserves the right to require further architectural treatment to any facade in order to satisfy the intentions of the architectural controls.

Phase 1 (Shakamohtaa Street, Schmeiser Bend & Lane, Underhill Road, and Delainey Road & Court)

Phase 1 Lot Type Map

click on map

Brighton, Saskatoon Land

Standard Lot - Attached Garage
Standard Lot Attached Garage 
Lots 1 to 22, Block 130
LOTS 1 TO 35, BLOCK 131 
LOTS 1 TO 21, BLOCK 132
LOTS 1 TO 40, BLOCK 135 
LOTS 1 TO 18, BLOCK 138 

Highly Visible Lots

(see Highly Visible Lots section below)

Lots 10, 11, Block 130 
LOTS 1, 17, 18, 35, BLOCK 131 
LOTS 1, 11, 12, 21, BLOCK 132 
LOTS 1, 13, 14, 35, BLOCK 135 
LOTS 1, 9, 10, 18, BLOCK 138

1. No dwelling shall be constructed on any of the lots which have an above-grade floor area (excluding attached decks, patios and garages) less than: 

    a. 1,000 square feet in the case of a bungalow or bi-level dwelling with lane;

    b. 1,200 square feet in the case of a bungalow or bi-level dwelling without lane;

    c. 1,200 square feet in the case of a two-storey dwelling with lane; or

   d. 1,475 square feet in the case of a two-storey dwelling without lane

2. All dwelling units shall be bungalows, raised bungalows, bi-levels, or two-storeys.  Split-level dwellings are NOT permitted. 

3. All dwellings must be constructed with a minimum single-wide attached garage. The garage must be constructed at the same time as the dwelling is built. Minimum inside dimensions shall be 3.5 metres wide and 6.0 metres long. 

4. There is no roof pitch requirement; however, the roof pitch should complement the architectural dwelling style and be consistent with the intent of strengthening the streetscape and harmonizing the interface between housing forms. 

5. All attached or side facing detached garages on standard lots require garage doors consistent with the architectural dwelling style.  

6. The undersides of raised entries, verandas, and stair systems must be fully enclosed. 

7. All dwellings require a minimum of two different exterior dwelling materials with visually different textures on the front elevation with each material being no less than 50 square feet in area.  A third material may also be used provided that a different colour is added not in the adjacent tone/shade to the primary and secondary materials used.  The second and third materials, when combined, must cover no less than 50 square feet of the front elevation. See Highly Visible Lots section below to determine if additional side or rear elevation materials are required. 

8. For lots 1, 2, 22 to 40, Block 135, a second garage or garage pad (if desired) off the lane shall NOT be built on the rear easement and must include a paved apron that connects the garage or garage pad to the rear property line. Garage pads must be poured concrete, minimum 20 feet x 20 feet (width may be adjusted based on utility locations). In addition to the above-noted lots in 8, the utility pedestal/transformer must not be inside the fence and must be accessible from the lane. 

9. A corner lot with a detached rear garage must comply with conditions 3 and 4 in the Highly Visible Lots section below. 

10. Lots 36 to 40 Block 135, could be constructed with dwellings that only had garage pads or detached garages off the lane if all five lots were built in this same manner.

11. Lots 11-22, Block 130 and lots 12-21, Block 132 require masonry as one of the materials on the front elevation.

 

Highly Visible Lots
Highly Visible Lots 
Lots 10, 11, Block 130 
Lots 1, 17, 18, 35, Block 131 
Lots 1, 11, 12, 21, Block 132 
Lots 1, 13, 14, 35, Block 135 
Lots 1, 9, 10, 18, Block 138
 

These controls are in addition to the controls noted in the previous sections. The intention of these controls is to avoid the monotony and the perceived cheapness of large expanses of blank walls on side and rear facades that are highly visible from streets. The lots that are relevant to these highly visible lot controls are identified in the map above. The following requirements listed are an absolute minimum. Saskatoon Land reserves the right to require further treatment to any facade in order to satisfy the intentions of the Phase 1 Architectural Controls.

In addition to the front facade requirements, any dwelling elevation which flanks a road:

1. Requires a secondary exterior dwelling material with visually different texture when compared to the primary material.  The secondary material must cover no less than one third (33%) of the elevation defined as the total area of elevation from ground to under the eaves. For the purpose of this calculation, window and door areas shall be subtracted. A third material may also be used provided that a different colour is added not in the adjacent tone/shade to the primary and secondary materials used.  The second and third materials, when combined, must cover no less than one third (33%) of the subject elevation. Horizontal banding of the base of the dwelling is discouraged as landscaping and fences tend to hide the material.  

2. Requires the windows and doors to occupy no less than 5% of the elevation defined as the total area of elevation from ground to under the eaves. 

3. Corner lots with a second detached garage must provide a second material.  The garage elevation which flanks a street will require a second exterior material that is comparable to the materials used on the dwelling. The second material must cover no less than 20 square feet of the garage side facing the street. 

4. Garage doors facing streets must be consistent with the architectural dwelling style. Added architectural details such as doors and/or windows are encouraged for garage elevations that flank streets. 

Depending on the quality of the submitted plans, especially those that satisfy only the “minimum” requirements of this document, the Design Review Committee may require more architectural details such as the following: 

  • Accented wall build-outs or other interruptions in wall planes. 
  • Window and door accents. 
  • Break-ups in roof massing or roof lines such as dormers or cross gables. 
  • Other accents or placement of additional materials and/or colour. 
Aspen Ridge, Saskatoon Saskatoon, Aspen Ridge
The area of the rear elevation (minus window area) totals 270 square feet. Ninty (90) square feet of stone has been provided, which satisfies the secondary material requirement. One hundred-forty (140) square feet of window/door placement has also been provided, which satisfies the window and/or door placement requirement on highly visible lots. The area of side elevation (minus window area) totals 300 square feet. One hundred (100) square feet of stone has been provided, which satisfies the secondary material requirement. Forty (40) square feet of window placement has also been provided, which satisfies the window and/or door requirement on highly visible lots.
Aspen Ridge, saskatoon Aspen Ridge, Saskatoon
The garage side that flanks the street has two materials 20 square feet or greater and one window The garage side that flanks the street has two materials greater than 20 square feet and is installed closest to the lane.

 

PLAN APPROVAL PROCESS

Saskatoon Land’s approval of dwelling plans is required prior to the submission of a building permit application. Builders are encouraged to meet with Saskatoon Land during the design stage to avoid potential delays.

The following information must be submitted to Saskatoon Land prior to the submission of a Building Permit Application:

  • Completed Application Form with garage door image or brochure for attached garages and highly visible garages.

  • One digital copy of the working drawings, including site plan, floor plan, and dwelling elevations. All exterior dwelling materials and square footage must be identified on the elevation plans.

**Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we will NOT be accepting any hard copies of application forms or working drawings. All documents must be submitted digitally.

To avoid delays, application forms and dwelling plans should be submitted to Saskatoon Land well in advance of applying for a Building Permit. Incomplete submissions will be held until the complete application is submitted. Plans will be reviewed for adherence to the architectural controls, and Saskatoon Land may contact the applicant to discuss any required revisions. Plans which do not meet all the architectural controls will be reviewed by Saskatoon Land’s Design Review Committee. The Design Review Committee’s decision is final and any revisions will be required to be made before approval.

Upon approval of the drawing set, Saskatoon Land will issue an approval letter to the applicant. Following this, builders may apply for their respective Building Permit. At the building permit stage, Saskatoon Land may review the Building Permit drawings again to ensure they are substantially consistent with the plans submitted during the review process.

Periodically, Saskatoon Land will inspect the project to ensure it is in substantial accordance with the approved plans. Builders/homeowners will be responsible for correcting any deficiencies to dwelling elevations which deviate from the approved plans.

All dwellings must pass architectural inspection in order to be eligible for driveway and landscape incentive rebates.

Architectural Control Application Form Please fill out the application form and send via email to: landarchcontrols@saskatoon.ca