You are here

Decisions in Brief

For immediate release: October 18, 2017 - 11:06am
MR17-213

From the October 10, 2017 Standing Policy Committee on Transportation
7.1.3 Infill Lane Paving Requirements

Decision

*The Committee carried a motion to recommend to City Council:

  1. That the Administration report back to the next meeting of the Standing Policy Committee on Transportation what the effect would be to discontinue charging alley paving fees for infill until a permanent policy is in place;
  2. That whereas infill development continues to lag behind the growth plan and the paving policy is likely to de-incentivize small and medium buildings, that the Standing Policy Committee on Transportation recommend to City Council:
  3. That, as part of permanent policy development, further study be done to investigate expanding the density bonus system to incentivize infill development in areas beyond the downtown district;
  4. That the Administration report back on the environmental impact of lane-paving as part of its climate change business plan; and
  5. That the Administration report back how the above will support the Growth Plan, as it pertains to infill.

Background

*City Council, at its meeting held on June 26, 2017, received an informational report entitled Measures to Incentivize Infill Development, from the General Manager, Community Services Department. This report provided an overview of the various initiatives underway to support the City of Saskatoon’s infill targets, and the implementation of both the Growth Plan to Half a Million and City Centre Plan. In all new development areas, lanes are paved and developers fund the cost of lane paving. Because infrastructure costs can be spread across all benefiting property owners and included in the price of the lot, there is a funding mechanism in place that does not require input from the mill rate. Infill developments in existing neighbourhoods with gravel lanes do not have such a funding mechanism in place. It is anticipated the round table process will provide valuable input for the Administration to use in developing a formal paved lane policy that aligns with a greater infill strategy, but until that time no formal policy exists.

7.1.4 Sid Buckwold Bridge Walkway Widening

Decision

*The Committee agreed that the report of the General Manager, Transportation & Utilities Department dated October 10, 2017, be received as information.

Background

*At its meeting held on November 28, 2016, City Council approved the award of engineering services to Stantec Consulting Ltd. for completion of the design and construction services for rehabilitation of the Sid Buckwold Bridge. The Standing Policy Committee on Transportation, at its meeting held on June 16, 2017, resolved: “That the Administration report back on adding design work on the pedestrian walkway of the Sid Buckwold Bridge in order to modify the walkway, in conjunction with the 2019 rehabilitation project, in support of the Active Transportation Plan.”

7.2.1 Right-of-Way Temporary Use Fees

Decision

*The Committee carried a motion to recommend to City Council:

  1. That the proposed fees for temporary use of the Right-of-Way be approved; and
  2. That the City Solicitor be requested to prepare the appropriate bylaw amendment to Bylaw No. 7200, The Traffic Bylaw.

Background

*City Council, at its meeting held on April 24, 2017, considered the report Amendments to Bylaw 7200, The Traffic Bylaw – Right-of-Way Fees and Fines and resolved, in part: “4. That the Administration enter into discussions with stakeholders related to the fees for Right-of-Way usage and report to the Standing Policy Committee on Transportation before the end of 2017.”

7.2.4 Inquiry – Former Councillor P. Lorje (March 3, 2014) Time Restrictions for Parking Turnover in Residential Neighbourhoods

Decision

*The Committee carried forward motions to recommend to City Council:

  1. That the Administration report back on the possibility of extending the time limit for parking in residential areas, while stipulating there will be an exemption for operational services levels; and
  2. That the Administration report back on the opportunity to apply for an exemption for a finite period of time.

Background

*The following inquiry was made by Former Councillor P. Lorje at the meeting of City Council held on March 3, 2014: “Will the Administration please review the requirement for parking turnover of private vehicles in residential neighbourhoods. Currently cars have to be moved at least every 36 hours. This poses a difficulty for people who wish to park their Inquiry – Former Councillor P. Lorje (March 3, 2014) Time Restrictions for Parking Turnover in Residential Neighbourhoods Page 2 of 4 car and go away for the weekend. Can consideration be given to lengthening the time restriction to 48, 60 or 72 hours.” At its meeting held on June 12, 2017, the Standing Policy Committee on Transportation considered the Street Cleaning and Sweeping Service Level report and resolved: “That the Standing Policy Committee on Transportation recommend to City Council Budget Deliberations, Option 1 of the report of the General Manager, Transportation & Utilities Department dated June 12, 2017, which is an increase to the annual budget allocation to meet the current service level.”

7.2.5 College Drive Speed Limit

Decision

*The Committee carried a motion to recommend to City Council that a speed limit of 80 kph on College Drive, from a point 100 meters east of Preston Avenue to the end of the College Drive and McOrmond Drive interchange, be established.

Background

*City Council at its meeting held on March 23, 2015, approved a report from the General Manager, Transportation & Utilities Department to change the classification of College Drive, between the CPR tracks and the city limits, to Urban Expressway in order to improve connectivity into the Holmwood Sector. Establishing the classification of the roadway and speed limit in advance is required to proceed with design of the interchange. A speed limit of 90 kph is being recommended for this purpose.

7.2.6 Complete Streets Design and Policy Guide

Decision

*The Committee agreed to recommend to City Council:

Background

*The Growth Plan was approved in principle by City Council in 2016. The directions of the Growth Plan provide guidance for civic investments in infrastructure and support programs over the short, medium, and long-term that will shape growth patterns and increase transportation choices, in order to achieve the social, economic, and environmental aspirations of the community. The Guide is a supporting document of the original Growth Plan work.

  1. That the Complete Streets Design and Policy Guide be adopted in principle; and
  2. That the Administration proceed with preparing a Council Policy based on the Complete Streets Design and Policy Guide provided in this report; and
  3. That the implementation plan be approved.